Fascinating Willow Trees

To raise willow from unrooted cuttings or whips, the willow ought to be cut and rooted after leaf fall and just before leaf bud – that should typically mean period between late November to early March.

Unrooted willow cuttings and whips must preferably be planted without delay on delivery, however, if this is not achievable, save them someplace cool and target planting in a couple of weeks.

With that in mind, the willow is very solid and persistent to survive. Cuttings that have set for months without cover will still usually root easily, and twigs pressed into the ground upside down to act as indicators have rooted!

willows

Weeping willow is rapidly growing trees. They easily grow ten feet per year, and invade the landscape. Willows like stagnant water, and will clean up problematic areas in the landscape vulnerable to pools, puddles and floods. Their weeping rounded shapes are what people adore. They also like to grow next to ponds, streams and lakes. Weeping willows aren’t picky about their soil variety either, they’re very flexible. Though they prefer damp, cool conditions, they can take drought in most cases. They’re a terrific solution to create an oasis of shade, if you have the area to develop these mellow giants.

Most willows have fairly green foliage and lengthy, thin leaves. In the fall, the color varies from a light yellow-green tone to a lovely blue color. Trees drop their leaves in the fall, and are perfect to provide summertime shade.

It’s interesting that they are one of the first trees to show its leaves and one of the last to drop them.

Watch your willow carefully, particularly during the summer; if the leaves start to drop, it’s not getting enough water. Keep the tree surroundings moist.

Remember to control weeds. Pull weeds out with your hands or gardening tools. Mulch the area with straw, cardboard or other organic substance. If needed, spew the area with herbicide after the willow has grown a year…